Goodbye Mog

Goodbye, Mog

Goodbye Mog

Judith Kerr
Collins, an imprint of HarperCollins Publishers, 2002

From the dust jacket, “’Mog was tired… Mog thought, “I want to sleep forever.” And so she did. But a little bit of her stayed awake to see what would happen next…’

“Judith Kerr’s stories about Mog have delighted children for more than thirty years and sold over three million copies worldwide. In Goodbye Mog, Judith Kerr uses characteristic warmth and humor to create an extra-special book about everyone’s favourite family cat.”

This is one of those books that talks about the death of a family pet in a gentle way. The author reminds the reader that even though the cat (or other pet) is physically gone from our lives, they remain there in spirit. This reminds me of something I read or heard somewhere – that as long as you remember your loved one they are never really dead. I like that at the end of the book, Mog moves on spiritually when his work is finished – as so often happens, when one pet leaves their human a new one comes along, not to replace the first pet, but to help the human heal and move forward in love and peace.

If you, your family, or someone you know has suffered the death of a beloved pet, this sweet picture book is an ideal way to approach the subject and, maybe, begin the healing process.

Rating 4 out of 5 paws; the author tackles a tough subject with absolute gentleness and hope.

Reviewer:

simon-loc

Simon

 

 

BIG CAT, little cat

big cat little cat

BIG CAT, little cat

Elisha Cooper
Roaring Brook Press, 2017

From the dust jacket: “There was a cat who lived alone. Until the day a new cat came … . From award-winning author Elisha Cooper comes a poignant story about friendship, family, and new beginnings.”

From the description on the dust jacket, it would seem this book is rather simple – but it’s not. Well, it is, on the surface. A cat lives alone with his family; they bring home a new kitten; the older (big) cat teaches the younger (little) cat how to be a cat. They have many years together until the older cat goes away – and doesn’t come back. Sad. But … . Can’t say – don’t want to ruin it.

Big Cat, Little Cat is a perfect vehicle for opening a dialog with your kittens about life and death and life. The very simple line drawings pack a punch, the words are few but powerful and the story evokes emotions of both joy and grief. The book is like haiku in that for a true wordsmith it only takes a few words to communicate volumes. Experienced readers will certainly be able to read the book on their own – but read it as a family, instead. It may evoke memories both joyful and sad that need to be spoken aloud so the love may be paid forward.

Rating: 5 of 5 paws because it’s a truly beautiful story that is overflowing with the truth of life.

Reviewer:

simon-loc

Simon

 

The Whole Town’s Talking

the whole towns talking

The Whole Town’s Talking

Fannie Flagg
Random House, 2016

From the dust jacket: “The one and only Fannie Flagg, bestselling author of Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Café, is at her superb best in this fun-loving, moving novel about what it means to be truly alive.
“Elmwood Springs, Missouri, is a small town like any other, but something strange is happening at the cemetery. Still Meadows, as it’s called, is anything but still. Original, profound, The Whole Town’s Talking, a novel in the tradition of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town and Flagg’s own Can’t Wait to Get to Heaven, tells the story of Lordor Nordstrom, his Swedish mail-order bride, Katrina, and their neighbors and descendants as they live, love, die, and carry on in mysterious and surprising ways.
… “With her trademark humor, wild imagination, great storytelling, and deep understanding of folly and the human heart, the beloved Fannie Flagg tells an unforgettable story of life, afterlife, and the remarkable goings-on of ordinary people. In The Whole Town’s Talking, she reminds us that community is vital, life is a gift, and love never dies.”

Fannie Flagg is a favorite author here at The Library and we read everything she writes. Ms Flagg didn’t disappoint this time – everything the publisher said about her being humorous, imaginative and a fabulous storyteller is all true. This novel is unlike her others in that it takes a grand overview of Elmwood Springs from its founding in 1889 until its ultimate demise in 2021. If you’re a reader of hers, then you’ll be familiar with the characters – Elner Shimfissle, Tot Whooten, and Norma Jenkins. They’re all there and more from her other books as well. (My favorite is Elner Shimfissle. What a character!!) It’s nice to see what happens to them after their books end.

Ms Flagg has an altogether original, some may say strange, outlook on life after death. I spent my time trying to imagine it – I can’t tell you imagine what exactly – I don’t want to give it away – but I really couldn’t and the very last surprise, saved until the last pages – will either make you laugh or shake your head in disbelief. I did both.

Rating 4 out of 5 paws because it was funny, sad, and mind-blowing all at once!!

Reviewer:

bobbiesue-loc

BobbieSue