The Hotel Cat

the hotel cat

 

The Hotel Cat
A Jenny’s Cat Club Book

Esther Averill
The New York Review Children’s Collection, 1969

From the back of the book: “On a cold winter night the heat goes off in Jenny Linksy’s house and Captain Tinker tells Jenny and her brothers Checkers and Edwards that they will all be spending the night at the Royal Hotel. As it turns out, this is no ordinary cold snap: this is the Big Freeze. Boilers all over the city are breaking down and people and pets are crowding into the hotel. In the midst of the confusion, Jenny is delighted to encounter her old friends from the Cat Club.

“Tom, the hotel cat, used to be a stray, living a tough life on the streets. One day he showed up at the Royal, and soon he was earning his keep as a mouser. But what’s Tom to do when so many new cats suddenly show up on his territory? Can he trust them? His friend Mrs. Wilkins has lived at the hotel for a long time and knows how to talk to cats. She persuades Tom to give the visitors a warm welcome. Which is how Tom and Jenny and the members of the Cat Club all come together to put on the unforgettable gala Stardust Winter Ball!”

So, with this Jenny’s Cat Club book we meet 2 new cats – one who, as it turns out, is from a previous book that we haven’t read – Jenny Goes to Sea. Our library doesn’t have it so it may take a while for us to find a copy to enjoy. But, nonetheless, the new/old character is Jack Tar, a ship’s cat that spends his shore leave with Captain Tinker and kitties. But the new cat, and the main one of this book, is Tom, former stray, now The Royal hotel cat. And what a character he is, too. He is at turns an old softie and a bit of a bully in the beginning but he learns to be tolerant of other cats and makes some forever friends.

Another charming addition to the Jenny’s Cat Club series; there are lessons in tolerance and acceptance, and in working together for the common good. I especially liked the addition of 2 humans to the story – these humans are special because they can converse with the cats easily and give them room to be cats. We wish all humans could do that!!! As with the other books, the print is a medium size so it’s good for somewhat experienced readers and older kittens may want to practice reading by sharing it with their younger siblings. The line drawings are sweet as well, although I did miss seeing Jenny’s scarf not printed in red! We’ve enjoyed the whole series and look forward to reading the other two somewhere down the line!

Rating 4 paws out of 5 – for storytelling at its finest and dancing cats!!

Reviewer:

peggysue-loc

PeggySue

 

Captains of the City Streets

captains of the city streets

Captains of the City Streets
A Jenny’s Cat Club Book

Esther Averill
The New York Review Children’s Collection, 1972

From the back of the book, “Sinbad and The Duke are two young tramps. They live on the streets and love “the free and easy life.” But they need somewhere to practice their boxing technique, so they leave the skyscrapers of Midtown for the houses and gardens of Greenwich Village—home to Jenny and the Cat Club. There Sinbad and The Duke find the perfect tumbledown backyard shack to call home and befriend a lonely kitten named Macaroni.

“When Sinbad and The Duke first happen to observe a meeting of the Cat Club, they’re sure that with its “Rules and Obligations,” it just isn’t their sort of thing. But the Cat Club turns out to need them, and before long the two street-smart fighters find reasons of their own to join the charmed – and charming – circle of Jenny and her friends.”

This prequel to Jenny and the Cat Club tells the history of Sinbad and The Duke as well as how Macaroni came to join the Cat Club. As with all the other Jenny books, this book is fun and sweet and an enjoyable story for kittens and adults alike. I would normally say I wouldn’t want to live in New York City, but the Greenwich Village where Sinbad and The Duke make their home sounds like a wonderful place to live. It is a rarity, of course, about cats living on their own with a kind human to feed them and provide a feeding station that has shelter from the wind and rain. Unfortunately, not all stray cats have humans who look after them, but it’s nice to think they do. And, I like how Sinbad and The Duke are so absolute in their refusal to join the Cat Club but they realize how lonely life on the streets is without friends and they ended up changing their minds.
Rating 4 out of 5 paws it’s a charming story (like the publisher said!) that is fun, sweet and suitable for all kittens. It also helps them to learn to be kind and generous to those stray cats who are in need.

Reviewer:

peggysue-loc

PeggySue

 

More Jenny Linsky and the Cat Club Adventures

2 More Adventures of Jenny:

jenny's moonlight adventure

Jenny’s Moonlight Adventure
A Jenny’s Cat Club Book

Esther Averill
The New York Review Children’s Collection, 1973, 1949

From the back of the book, “Hallowe’en, a special night for black cats everywhere, but especially for Jenny, the shy little black cat in a red scarf from Greenwich Village!

“At nine o’clock the entire Cat Club will convene for an even that each and every one of the cats, from Romulus and Remus, to wise old Solomon, has been eagerly awaiting: the beautiful Persian, Madame Butterfly, will be performing a concert for them on her crystal flute. Except Madame Butterfly has hurt herself and – not only that – she has lost her flute! Where can it be, and when they find it, how can they get it back to Madame Butterfly so that she can play? Hallowe’en is Jenny’s night, and it’s Jenny who comes up with a plan, a very adventurous one, too. But will she pull it off?”

Of course, Jenny pulls it off! It wouldn’t be a Jenny Linsky story if she didn’t! She faces her paralyzing fear of dogs by outsmarting them, helping her friends in the process.

*********************************************************

 

the school for cats

The School for Cats
A Jenny’s Cat Club Book

Esther Averill
The New York Review Children’s Collection, 1973, 1947

From the back of the book: “Jenny Linsky, the shy little black cat of Greenwich Village, has never been to school. Until, that is, the day her master, Captain Tinker, decides it’s time for her to study cat lore in the country. The School for Cats seems like a scary place at first, full of strangers who know how to do all sorts of clever things that Jenny doesn’t understand. Worse still, Pickles, the Fire Cat, famous for chasing all the littler cats around with his fire truck, is a student there! He frightens Jenny so much that one day she runs away.

“But she doesn’t stay away for long. After an adventure in the forest that helps her feel braver, Jenny realizes she’s ready to face school and Pickle’s teasing. Which is how Jenny learns a lesson in courage and Pickles in consideration, and the two become friends for life.”

Wow! I wish I could go to school like Jenny! The school is like sleep-away camp but much more fun! Even though Jenny ran away from Pickles at first, she learns to stand up to him; this is the same Pickles that was in the first book I reviewed, Jenny and the Cat Club.

The copies I read are printed large enough for early readers and the black and white pictures are adorable with accents of red, yellow and orange. Please check out these little books for yourself or your kittens!!

 

Rating for both books: 4 out of 5 paws because I love this series for its gentleness and innocence – perfect for young kittens who are not yet jaded by the insanity of the world.

Reviewer:

peggysue-loc

PeggySue

Jenny and the Cat Club

jenny and the cat club

Jenny and the Cat Club

Esther Averill
New York Review of Books, Children’s Collection, 1973, 1944

From the back of the book, “In Greenwich Village an orphaned black cat lives happily with her master, a sea captain. Still, the gentle Jenny Linsky would like nothing more than to join the local Cat Club, whose members include Madame Butterfly, an elegant Persian, the high-stepping Macaroni and the stately, plump Mr. President. But can she overcome her fears and prove that she, too, has a special gift? Join Jenny and her friends, including fearless Pickles the Fire Cat, on their spirited downtown adventures and discover why The Atlantic Monthly has called Jenny “a personality ranking not far below such giants as Peter Rabbit.”

Jenny and the Cat Club is the first in a short series of early reader books published originally in the mid-to-late 1940’s and is absolutely adorable. Jenny is a sweet black cat who longs to ‘belong’. She gets her wish and together with the other members of the Cat Club goes to her first party; loses her treasured red scarf (and gets it back again); and brings home two new ‘brothers’ for her master to adopt (he does, of course!). This little book is full of sweetness, innocence and the joy of being young.

The illustrations are simple black ink drawings with highlights of red, yellow and orange – very cute, too!

Rating 4 out of 5 paws because how can you not love a black cat???

Reviewer:

peggysue-loc

PeggySue