Pumpkin Cat

pumpkin cat a

Pumpkin Cat

Ann Turner

Illustrated by Amy June Bates

From the dust jacket: “One stormy night just before Halloween, a soaked ginger cat finds shelter in a warm library. Pumpkin Cat, as she is named by the welcoming librarians, realizes how luck she is to have found a safe place where she’s cared for and where children come to visit every day.

“Yet once the sun sets and Pumpkin Cat is alone, she recognizes that the library can’t yet truly be called “home.” Something special is missing—but what is it?”

This is a completely sweet story about a ginger (orange, or red) cat swept away by a rain storm only to wash up across the street from a library. And even though she is well loved by everyone, she still longs for something that would make her home a home.

The publisher recommends the book for 3-7 year-olds and considering the long story and large number of words, I would say that it’s an accurate age range. But, the younger kittens would enjoy the book being read to them, if only to enjoy the watercolor illustrations which are expressive and very pretty. It is a Halloween book and even though the kitty is scared a little, there’s nothing scary about it. This is a lovely seasonal book that doesn’t have to be read in season!

Rating 4 out of 5 paws because Pumpkin Cat is orange like Toby and he insisted it be so!!

Reviewer:

witch-simon
Simon

Purr M for Murder

purr m for murder

Purr M for Murder
A Cat Rescue Mystery

T. C. LoTempio
Crooked Lane Books, an imprint of The Quick Brown Fox & Company, LLC., 2017

From the dust jacket, “Sydney McCall left behind an ex-fiancé and a New York advertising job to return home to Deer Park, North Carolina, and help her sister, Kat, run the local animal shelter, Friendly Paws. Determined to save the shelter from financial trouble, Sydney and Kat organize a cat café fundraising event at a local coffee shop. Things are looking up until their landlord, Trowbridge Littleton, threatens to shut down the event. When Sydney drops by his art gallery to make peace, she finds Kat – along with Littleton’s dead body.

“Local homicide detective Will Worthington—who just happens to be Sydney’s old high school crush—is highly suspicious of the sisters’ involvement. Desperate to clear their names from the suspect list, Sydney pounces on the investigation. With the help of one of the shelter cats, a savvy orange tabby named Toby, Sydney begins poking her nose into other local business whose owners may have benefited from Littleton’s death—until the killer notices she’s pawing a little too closely at the truth.”

Toby and I argued over who would read this book – I said I should because it’s the protagonist is female and he said he should read it because the story revolves around an orange and white tabby named Toby who solves a murder. We decided to read it together; he of course wanted to emphasize all the ‘Toby’ parts, but since I’m writing the actual review, I’ll tell you about the whole book.

We both enjoyed this little murder mystery – it had us guessing until the end – the murder of Littleton takes place off stage – so there’s no violence in the beginning, but things do get a little dicey for Sydney when she uncovers who the murder is and they try to get her. (Toby wants to insert here that his namesake saves the day!!!). I liked the concept of surrounding this ‘cozy’ at a pet shelter – and the cat café idea is really cool to let folks meet their new feline companions.

It’s a standard genre mystery – with the main character a strong, independent-minded woman who is not in law enforcement but gets involved in solving crimes and has a relationship with a man who is in law enforcement, who continually cautions her not to get involved but understands and forgives her when she gets herself into trouble. That’s not a bad thing – its’ just part of the genre. I wouldn’t want a steady diet of these books, but they’re a nice break from all the other books we read and review.

Rating 4 out of 5 paws because the story is an enjoyable and convoluted mystery with likeable characters that includes cats!!! Toby wants to interject here that he gives it 5 paws because the hero of the book is Toby!

Reviewer: BobbieSue
bobbiesue-loc

(and…)

toby-loc
Toby

The Cat Who Got Carried Away

the cat who got carried away

The Cat Who Got Carried Away
Allan Ahlberg
Illustrated by Katharine McEwen
Walker Books, 2003

From the back of the book: “Gus and Gloria have a lot of running to do, Mrs Gaskitt hardly ever gets out of bed and something dreadful happens to Horace!”

Horace is a cute cat that lives with his humans, a mom, a dad, a brother and a sister. He’s just enjoying life, sitting on the wall near his home, watching the world go by, when suddenly, he’s PETNAPPED!!!! Along with many other pets in the village where he lives, his petnappers take him to another town and put him up for sale in a Pet Shop, of all places!! Will he go free and be able to get back home before someone else buys him? Will he make friends with Randolph Rat and Maurice Guinea Pig so they can escape? Who’s the brains of this group, anyway?

This is a great little chapter book for independent readers but young kittens would love to have it read to them over a couple of days. And after you’ve finished it, maybe you can think of other ways Nat could have escaped or foiled those mean ol’ petnappers. The illustrations are simple but charming, and Horace is a likeable, if a little flighty, cat hero!

Rating 4 out of 5 paws because the book has a lot of ‘cute’ factor – cute cat, cute pictures, cute story, even kinda cute petnappers!

Reviewer:

peggysue-loc
PeggySue

 

Lola Gets a Cat

lola gets a cat

Lola Gets a Cat

Anna McQuinn
Illustrated by Rosalind Beardshaw
Charlesbridge, 2017

From the dust jacket: “Lola really wants a cat. But Mommy says pets are a lot of work. Lola is eager to find out more.
“She reads all about cats at the library. She takes extra good care of her stuffed cat toys. When Lola finally gets to adopt a cat of her own, she knows just what to do.”

Awwwww – this book is very Awwwww worthy! If you’re a human and your kitten, er, child wants a cat, this is a book to read. It shows exactly how it should happen. Read, practice, adopt!!!

Lola is so adorable with all her cat paraphernalia in her room (she reminds me of mom and her cat stuff!). We ABSOLUTELY LOVE that Lola’s mom takes her to the LIBRARY to find out more information. Books are way better than Googling it! Then she puts in to practice what she’s read – never were stuffed kitties so well fed! Then it’s time and off to the shelter they go – another thing we ABSOLUTELY LOVE! – to find the right kitty. Kitty is finally brought home and learns how much Lola loves her.

Thinking of adopting one of us regal creatures to grace your home? Read this ‘how-to’ book first! You won’t regret it.

Rating 5 out of 5 paws because there is nothing we don’t like about this story and has everything to love in it!!

Reviewer:

simon-loc
Simon

 

A Cat Named Swan

a cat named swan.jpg

A Cat Named Swan

Holly Hobbie
Random House, 2017

From the back of the book: “When this abandoned kitten is adopted, his whole world is transformed….”

Sweet little kitten wakes up to find his mother and siblings gone – and of course the reader’s heart is breaking. Poor kitten wanders the city streets eating garbage to survive. By now the reader is wondering “Is there an upside to this story?” Well, I’m here to tell you, there is! One day the kitten is stuck in a tree and eventually rescued by Animal Control and taken to a (hopefully no-kill) shelter. He is soon adopted, named Swan, and learns to love and accept love by humans.

This story is more real, I think, than fantasy. It’s very stark in its depiction of the dangers that street cats and kittens face. It’s very truthful when it comes to shelters. A quote for your consideration: “But now there was food. Soon, when nothing harmed him or frightened him, he became less afraid. The new place was safe. Boredom was better than misery.” Did you pick up on that left-handed compliment? ‘Boredom better than misery.’ I’m sure shelters are boring for formerly outdoor kitties. I was never in a shelter, having been placed in a foster home immediately from the streets. And, even though the author is telling the story from the kittens’ POV, that phrase just struck me as odd in a children’s picture book. Maybe I’m just being overly picky; it just bothers me. The rest of the story is, of course, the happily ever after fairy tale. Swan is loved by all and learns to love his humans.

Although it is a lovely story, I’m not sure I would read it to my kittens. The first part is too real for the very youngest. And as the type is small-medium, and there’s a lot of words, beginning readers might have difficulty with it on their own. All-in-all, a well-written book with lovely illustrations; it’s just not for me.

Rating 3 out of 3 paws for being too raw for my tastes in the beginning.

Reviewer:

simon-loc
Simon